Wetland wonders

When I loaded today’s images I was delighted with a humble picture of a duck. It was a bit embarrassing actually, I hadn’t noticed the droplets of water on its sweet head and they took my breath away. They are even in the reflection. I adore such details: the fringed feathers, the smooth bill, the small push of water at its chest. Sometimes its worth clicking on an image to magnify the details, then on the back button to return to the page. I like being able to study the mysteries of birds without holding them in my hand and feeling the throb of a stressed heartbeat.

 

Pacific Black Duck (Anas superciliosa)
Canon 7D, 100-400mm L IS USM, AE priority f/5.6, handheld, natural light

 

A darter was sunning herself on the concrete outlet tower at the end of the lake: the harshness of her perch magnifies the softness of her feathers. Looking at this image I can hardly believe I’ve previously found this species quite ugly.

 

Australasian Darter (female) (Anhinga novaehollandiae)
Canon 7D, 100-400mm L IS USM, AE priority f/5.6, handheld, natural light

 

Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio)
Canon 7D, 100-400mm L IS USM, AE priority f/5.6, handheld, natural light

 

Little Black Cormorant (Phalacrocorax sulcirostris)
Canon 7D, 100-400mm L IS USM, AE priority f/5.6, handheld, natural light

 

Little Black Cormorant
Canon 7D, 100-400mm L IS USM, AE priority f/5.6, handheld, natural light

 

Little Black Cormorant – wet washing hanging out to dry, well wet wings hanging out to dry.
Canon 7D, 100-400mm L IS USM, AE priority f/5.6, handheld, natural light

 

Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra)
Canon 7D, 100-400mm L IS USM, AE priority f/5.6, handheld, natural light

 

Northern Mallard (male) (Anas platyrhynchos) – Mallards were introduced from Europe during the mid 1800s as a huntingspecies. They are impacting native duck species by interbreeding.
Canon 7D, 100-400mm L IS USM, AE priority f/5.6, handheld, natural light

 

Cormorants and darters have feathers that are not waterproof. They can often be seen perched near water with their wings outstretched to dry themselves after diving for food.

Happy birding, Kim

 

 

 

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